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IPC Speaker, Travis Langley: “Batman and Psychology: A Dark and Stormy Knight”

Event Description

Travis Langley, the acclaimed author of the book Batman and Psychology: A Dark and Stormy Knight will take part in several talks at Illinois State University and the Normal Theater on September 14 and 15. All events are free and open to the public.

Addressing his popular book, Langley will give a talk at 2 p.m. Thursday, September 14, in the Circus Room of the Bone Student Center. Titled “Batman and Psychology: A Dark and Stormy Knight,” the talk is part of the speaker series, “Virtually Human: Science, Art, and the 21st Century Self.”

Langley is a professor of psychology at Henderson State University in Arkansas, and studies and lectures on the psychology behind popular culture. He is the editor of many books in the Popular Culture Psychology series by Sterling Publishers, including those that delve into Wonder Woman, Star Wars, The Walking Dead, and Game of Thrones.

An engaging and sought-after speaker, Langley regularly addresses the ideas of heroism and villainy at universities and conferences around the globe as well as popular-culture conventions, including Comic Cons in San Diego, New York, and Chicago. His expertise is sought for documentaries, and he appears in films such as Necessary Evil: Super-Villains of DC Comics and Legends of the Knight. The journal Psychology Today carries his blog “Beyond Heroes and Villains.”

The events are sponsored in part by Illinois State University’s Department of Psychology, Institute for Prospective Cognition, Psi Chi student organization, the Harold K. Sage Fund, and the Illinois State University Foundation. The event is part of the Heroes Rising series from the Department of Psychology.

For additional information on the events, contact the Department of Psychology at (309) 438-8687.

If you will need special accommodations, please contact the event organizer.

Organizers

Department of Psychology
Institute for Prospective Psychology